Graduate Students


Alex Barnard


Alex Barnard is a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology at Berkeley, as well as a visiting 20150216-_dsc2899-copyscholar at Columbia University and the École des hautes études en sciences sociales in Paris. His doctoral dissertation compares mental health care systems in the United States and France, focusing on how states and public policies influence the classificatory practices that construct persons with mental illness as deviant, dangerous, deserving, or disabled. His totally unrelated previous ethnographic research studied freegan anti-waste activists in New York City from 2007 to 2009 and the anti-capitalist group Food Not Bombs in Berkeley in 2012. His first book, Freegans: Diving into the Wealth of Food Waste in the United States, was released in 2016 by the University of Minnesota Press and is available in the dumpster of your local anarchist bookstore.

Lindsay Berkowitz


headshot_professional_smallLindsay’s dissertation research is on how healthcare is changing in relation to contemporary forms of chronic illness. She focuses on the coevolving relationship between the structure of healthcare and how chronic illness is understood and experienced. She also researches women’s health, contested illnesses, community-based healthcare, and integrative medicine. Her policy work is through a grant from the Social Security Administration, where she conducts research on how chronic pain is evaluated in the disability determination process. Lindsay is affiliated with the Berkeley Center for Social Medicine (BCSM) and is the PI of the Social Research on Healthcare Lab. 

http://www.lindsayberkowitz.com/

Santiago Molina


IMG_9941.jpgSantiago Molina is a doctoral student in sociology. Santiago’s current research focuses on development of norms and standards of practice in genetic engineering and the adoption of new technologies in distinct institutional research contexts. He is currently conducting ethnographic research at two labs in the Bay Area that deploy CRISPR/Cas gene editing techniques in their work. Santiago’s other research focuses on the development and logics of classification systems, particularly the use of racial, ethnic, and national categories in population genetics, physical anthropology and genetic epidemiology. More broadly he is interested in national asymmetries in science and the development of the scientific ethic in the 21st Century.

http://sociology.berkeley.edu/graduate-student/santiago-j-molina

Josh Seim


Josh Seim is a doctoral candidate in sociology. He focuses on medicine and punishment, but he is also interested in labor, state, and city. He has previously published on the carceral experience of soon-to-be-released prisoners and on the craft of teaching social theory. In addition to writing a dissertation on urban ambulance operations, he is researching how parolees are disciplined into the low-wage labor market and how medical emergencies vary between neighborhoods.

David Showalter


David Showalter (they/them/their) is a doctoral student in sociology. David’s research Showalter Bio Picture.jpgfocuses on illicit drug use and drug policy, particularly injection drug use, opioids like heroin and prescription painkillers, and the influence of place-specific geography, institutions, and meanings on patterns of drug consumption. David’s other research topics include syringe exchange programs, penal psychiatry, and reality television. David also serves as President of the Board of Directors for Needle Exchange Emergency Distribution, which provides low-threshold harm reduction services to people who use drugs in the San Francisco Bay Area.

http://sociology.berkeley.edu/graduate-student/david-showalter